1. did not know my fave veggie restaurant in London had a blog WITH THEIR RECIPES.

     
  2. image: Download

    (via Creative Review:Ryman Eco, a ‘sustainable’ free font)
A few notes on its ‘sustainability’:
* it “uses around 30 per cent less ink than Arial, Times New Roman, Georgia and Verdana”
* “we could save over 490 million ink cartridges and 15 million barrels of oil” according to the ad agency commissioned to create it
* other ‘sustainable fonts’ are available: “Dutch company SPRANQ has won numerous awards for its Eco Font type family, released in 2008, which uses holes in letters to reduce ink waste.”

Download Ryman Eco here.

    (via Creative Review:Ryman Eco, a ‘sustainable’ free font)
    A few notes on its ‘sustainability’:
    * it “uses around 30 per cent less ink than Arial, Times New Roman, Georgia and Verdana”
    * “we could save over 490 million ink cartridges and 15 million barrels of oil” according to the ad agency commissioned to create it
    * other ‘sustainable fonts’ are available: “Dutch company SPRANQ has won numerous awards for its Eco Font type family, released in 2008, which uses holes in letters to reduce ink waste.”

    Download Ryman Eco here.

     
  3. [An algorithm is] an editorial opinion encoded into an equation that powers things like the Facebook news feed or the Twitter discovery window… trying to figure out what’s good: what people want to consume. These little pieces of code are more powerful now than a lot of the most powerful editors in media.
    — Upworthy CEO Eli Parisoer - author of The Filter Bubble - offers his definition of the new world order.
    From Upworthy’s Founder Talked At SXSW… And You’ll Never Guess What He Said | tech | theguardian.com
     
  4. Send them to the chemistry departments, send them to the zoology departments, send them to the anthropology departments and the astronomy departments and physics departments, and all the medical and law schools. That’s where the writers are most likely to be…

    I’m no scientist at all. I’m glad, though, now that I was pressured into becoming a scientist by my father and my brother. I understand how scientific reasoning and playfulness work, even though I have no talent for joining in. I enjoy the company of scientists, am easily excited and entertained when they tell me what they’re doing. I’ve spent a lot more time with scientists than with literary people.

    — On the importance of a well-rounded, tangentially-relevant education for people pursuing the creative occupations, from author Kurt Vonnegut in an interview (a compilation of four) for The Paris Review, Spring 1977.
     
  5. 05:06 26th Nov 2013

    Notes: 2

    Reblogged from kthread

    Tags: designliteracytechnology

    kthread:

    Wrote something about naming and food and pleasure and life.

     
  6. I ran a marathon on Sunday. The 30th Florence Marathon. It was a spectacular day. The sun was shining. I’d been training for this for 16 weeks, across four different countries, starting in Scotland, cruising through London, running through Italy and across the USA.

    I crossed the finish line in 4 hours, 10 minutes and 10 seconds. Just as I was passing the 20km mark, at 01:59, I saw the Ukrainian runner who won it cruising over Pointe Vecchio. He finished his 42 km ten minutes later.

    I’m still not sure why I did it. I was entered by someone else. But I did it anyway. Ask me in a week whether I’d do it again.

     
  7. The evolution of "the Florence studio" for The Guardian’s Tech Weekly and for simulrecs for BBC Radio 4’s The Digital Human.

    Here’s how it’s played out:

    WEEK ONE: I started out with my fancy recorder and microphone, and the basic kit that producer Jason Phipps gave me when I left London: a tabletop mic stand and some acoustic foam.

    WEEK TWO: I started getting fancy. The room I’m recording in is in the eaves of a renaissance-era stone house. The floor is stone tile, the walls are made of stone, there are big single-pane windows with wooden shutters (no curtains), the ceiling is, effectively, the inside of the tile roof, and there are two large skylights. In other words, audio recording nightmare.

    So I started by putting a pillow on top of the audio foam.

    WEEK THREE: I created a little cave for the mic. Unfortunately, the mic kinda got lost.

    WEEK FOUR: As week 3, but with the dog’s mattress on the lamp behind me. Just ‘cause. See, every time I’ve been in a studio, there’s softness everywhere, to catch the audio waves and reduce reflected sound. The recordings were echo-y to my ear, so I thought this might help. Thankfully, he doesn’t shed.

    WEEK FIVE: I started building forts.

    The first one wasn’t much more structurally exciting than adding a blanket over my head to the setup in week 1. But by the next week, my newfangled Editor’s Keys portable vocal booth pro2 arrived, and I was able to get seriously creative.

    WEEK SIX: There are pieces of bed involved. Suitcases. And the foam Jason gave me on the mic stand behind. And towels. And the dog’s bed. And a lap desk. It’s very exciting. it’s also raining directly above my head onto the skylight, which is noisy. Must try harder.

    WEEK SEVEN: I am in a more complete fort. Every pillow in the house has been enlisted. Every blanket. Clamps. Clips. And I am trapped. I literally can’t get out. Help.

    Listen to the results here and here.

     
  8. Over the past five years, every writer I know has been told by their agent to ‘monetise the activity around their writing’. Give talks. Go to conventions. Judge prizes. Write reviews. Write articles. Go on telly. Go on radio. Go on Twitter. Build your brand.

    The problem with all these activities is that nobody actually wants to pay you to do them. Instead, you are given vague assertions that it will be good for sales, good for your profile, and if you do all these things, then my son, there will be jam for tea.

    Well, I’m now 41, have written 10 books over 12 years, and for me it’s tea time. The kettle has come to the boil, the Crown Derby is laid out, the bread is sliced and I need the jam right now. In short, I want to be paid for what I do.

    from Literary Review, HT Ben, FAO Ben.

     
  9. image: Download

    The Urban Homestead®
A crazy dream…

HT Ben

    The Urban Homestead®

    A crazy dream…

    HT Ben

     
  10. 16:18 20th May 2013

    Notes: 13

    Reblogged from lomokev

    Tags: photographyself-portrait

    image: Download

    lomokev:

Set of portraits by Moa Karlberg taken though a two way mirror. Subjects are unaware of the camera as they are glancing at there own refection. See more on Moa Karlberg’s website here.

Am I over-reading a gendered self-criticism?

    lomokev:

    Set of portraits by Moa Karlberg taken though a two way mirror. Subjects are unaware of the camera as they are glancing at there own refection. See more on Moa Karlberg’s website here.

    Am I over-reading a gendered self-criticism?